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If You Miss This Year’s Eclipse, Chase Another

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Eclipse chasers may seem a little intense—they often go to great lengths to see total solar eclipses around the world, booking hotels and flights years in advance. If you didn’t plan years ahead for totality on August 21, or if you find yourself addicted after experiencing it, you’re in luck. The next eclipse is just less than two years out, and another chance comes to the United States in just seven years. Here’s a list of notable upcoming total solar eclipses, and some of the stunning places you can view them.

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July 2, 2019, or December 14, 2020

The next possible opportunity to see a total solar eclipse is in Chile and Argentina in 2019, but the air might be a little brisk and clouds could get in the way—July is winter in the Southern Hemisphere. But the 2020 eclipse passes over the same countries during the summer. Both Termas Geometricas, a cluster of hot springs in Chile, and the caves of Villarrica Volcano lie in the path of totality. They might not be the best places to view the eclipse itself, but they’ll make for great stops once it’s over.

April 8, 2024

It’s unusual for the same region to experience two eclipses in close succession, but the United States will have another total eclipse soon, this time from Texas up to the Great Lakes. Mexico and Canada will catch totality, too. The path of totality for this eclipse even crosses the August 21 path, so some places—Carbondale, Illinois, aren’t you lucky—will get to see two in less than a decade. And this time around, totality will last nearly twice as long as for the 2017 eclipse. There will be plenty of picturesque places to watch. Unique viewing locations include El Faro de Mazatlán, a lighthouse in Mexico, or next to a model of Earth in Houlton, Maine. Hopefully April showers won’t be an issue.

August 12, 2026

This solar eclipse makes landfall in just two places—western Iceland and Spain—but the view will be great no matter which country you pick. Iceland's famous Blue Lagoon lies right in the path of totality, and so does Reykjavík. Farther south in Spain, there are plenty of castles and monastery ruins that would make stunning backdrops.

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August 2, 2027

At its height, this total eclipse will last a whopping six minutes and 23 seconds near Luxor in Egypt. Gibraltar, the northern coast of Africa, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and Somalia also lie along the path of totality. If you’ve been looking for an excuse to check out Oran, Tangier, or Luxor, this eclipse fits the bill. Or you could watch the eclipse from a small sliver of Spain in Morocco, or the ruins of an ancient Roman city on the Libyan coast.

July 22, 2028

Some parts of Australia will experience five total eclipses in the next 30 years. This particular one has a path of totality that passes directly over Sydney. The Royal Botanic Gardens or the Sydney Observatory are sure to be great spots to watch, but if you like an eclipse with a side of weird geology, the Devil's Marbles or the Bungle Bungle Range are perfect choices. The eclipse will also be visible in New Zealand, with Milford Sound and the Moeraki Boulders in the path of totality.

September 2, 2035

China's and North Korea's capital cities both lie along this eclipse's path of totality, along with part of Japan, north of Tokyo. The Beijing Ancient Observatory may have been constructed to view distant stars, but visitors will be able to experience one minute and 33 seconds of totality there. Alternatively, you could watch the eclipse surrounded by Japanese macaques at the Jigokudani Monkey Park in Nagano, Japan.

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August 23, 2044

Only a small slice of Montana and a swath of Alberta and the Northern Territories will see this total solar eclipse, but that includes some incredible landscapes. The unearthly rock formations of Makoshika State Park, in eastern Montana, will offer a quiet place to watch the eclipse (and impressively dark skies for stargazing). The Hoodoos of Drumheller Valley are similarly strange rock formations in Alberta, and also lie in the path of totality.

August 12, 2045

If, by the time this eclipse rolls around, coast-to-coast paths of totality seem like old hat to you, you can spice up your eclipse-viewing experience with a trip to the Caribbean or South America. The path of this one starts in Northern California and bends down to pass through Florida (right over both Disney World and Miami), but the location of longest totality—six minutes and five seconds—is in the Bahamas, near the Great Isaac Cay. Book your boat now. Nearly all of the Dominican Republic and the northern coast of South America, from Venezuela to Brazil, will also see full occlusion.

August 2, 2046

People along the path of totality through Angola, Botswana, South Africa, and virtually all of the nation of Swaziland will be treated to nearly five minutes of darkness during this eclipse. Some areas in the path are not especially comfortable—such as the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans, which you will likely have all to yourself—but an ancient stone calendar in South Africa would be a fitting setting.

Other Notable Total Solar Eclipses

Two eclipses will be visible from parts of Indonesia, and a small bit of Australia on April 20—first in 2023 and again in 2042. Another eclipse visible in Australia, as well as parts of southern Africa, will take place on November 25, 2030. Australia and New Zealand will see other eclipses on July 13, 2037, and December 26, 2038. Some of the least accessible eclipses include one on November 14, 2031, that just barely grazes Panama, another on March 30, 2033, that will only be visible in northern Alaska and a tiny bit of Russia, and one on December 15, 2039, that can only be seen in remote parts of Antarctica (remote even by Antarctic standards). Parts of Africa, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and China will see an eclipse on March 20, 2034, and Africa will catch another on April 30, 2041.

Make your plans accordingly.

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minderella
1 day ago
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update: is the work environment I’ve created on my team too exclusive?

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Remember the letter-writer last week whose employee had quit and said in her exit interview that the team environment was too cliquish? She ended up adding more details in the comments on the original post, including that some employees had been mocking the employee who quit on SnapChat, and when someone complained to HR, the letter-writer wanted to move the person who complained to another team.

Here’s the update.

I was fired today without severance. When my letter was published, I was already on suspension based on the exit interview investigation, poor management practices and complaints from other areas, none of which I believe are accurate. HR and the management team stated I had mismanaged my team and the ex-employee. I had given assignments meant for her and assigned to her by my director to other members on the team because I wanted to develop them, including my newly promoted senior. As a manager, I knew my team better. Giving special assignments to her, even though it was her role, screwed over my long term team members who would complain to me. I had also downgraded  her end-of-year evaluation. I don’t think she deserved the praise she received from the sales staff, my directorand client executives. Her work just wasn’t that good to me. I thought if my team and I froze her out, she would leave. I called it un-managing.

My team found her quietness and her ability to develop sales presentations and connect with each client was very show-off-like. When she asked for help, we didn’t take it seriously because we thought she acted like she knew everything and she was making us look bad by always going above and beyond for no reason. My team and I had worked together for 5-6 years so I knew them, their work and their personalities better than anyone else so I took what they said with more seriousness. I also thought that her years of experience were irrelevant; she didn’t have anything beyond a bachelor’s degree (most of us were smart and dedicated enough to get a masters) and her experience was in a different subset of insurance.

HR and my regional vice president stated she had been hired to fill a role for a growing segment of our business and should have functioned as a team consultant. I used her as an associate so it didn’t make waves with the rest of the team. By losing her, we lost clients and leverage in the marketplace. Our sales territory couldn’t afford to lose any more business under my “mismanagement” and the HR was worried about damage to the brand name. During her employment, my director and I had several meetings on her role as she also dotted line reported to him. I had continued to be insubordinate because ex-employee, in my opinion, didn’t fit in and needed to earn her way to what my director had envisioned for her. If her role had panned out, she would have been higher up than me after two years when I had been there for five.

HR told me the brewery beer runs were against company policy and I should have stopped the SnapChats, especially those who had it on their company phones. I disagree that it was bullying because she wasn’t on Snap so if she didn’t see it, how is this bullying? I also don’t know how/if I should have monitored this with my team. My entire team was fired. The reasons for the firings included alcohol at work, even though we were physically at the brewery, inappropriate social media behavior, and not meeting the code of conduct.

I’m not sure the lesson(s) I’m supposed to learn; I feel like I was the scapegoat for a favored employee’s reason to leave. Being dedicated to your work doesn’t mean you can’t have fun at the same time. My former team and I are wondering if we can take action against ex-employee — her exit interview damaged our reputation, our team, and our careers.

With this letter-writer’s permission, I’m also printing here some of the email exchange that I had with her after receiving this update.

Me: I’m sorry to ask this, but I’m trying to figure out if this is real or not. There’s a lot in here that’s making me question it. You haven’t responded to any of the points brought up in my original answer or in the comments. Why?

Letter-writer (LW): Because I disagree with your points and I don’t want to constantly defend myself. My ex employee made me look bad and I thought that as Ask a Manager you would side with a manager.

… I still think my entire situation is messed up that my team got tanked because of someone who couldn’t handle the office and who didn’t need to be there anyway.

I get that I am a shitty manager unless you actually worked with me but I worked with friends for 5 years. I didn’t want the ex employee to begin with. So I wanted to make it uncomfortable for her to leave and didn’t think I’d lose my job in the process.

Me: Do you not understand that what you did was illegal? (Note: When I wrote this, I was thinking the employee was in her 40s, which would mean age discrimination laws were in play. Upon re-reading the letter, she’s actually in her 30s so my point here was poorly formed.)

LW: Is it illegal to not like someone? No one got hurt except for someone’s feelings and she left the company. I don’t understand what or how I did was illegal. I’m not getting the lesson that I should have learned. I should not have been fired because someone didn’t like how she was being managed. She left on her own terms. It’s not like I fired her and if I did, I work in an at will state so I could have gotten rid of her at any time. But I’m not that mean.

Me: It’s illegal to retaliate against someone (like moving them to another department or taking them off assignments, etc.) for reporting harassment. You opened your company up to legal jeopardy. At-will employment has exceptions to it, including retaliation after someone reports harassment.

Beyond that, you’ve been managing your team in really horrible, ineffective ways, and it sounds like you’re not willing to do serious reflection on that. You’re digging in your heels and insisting that what you did wasn’t a big deal, but any decent company will think it’s a very big deal — so you’re really hurting yourself professionally by refusing to change your thinking.

LW: I didn’t retaliate. I wanted to remove the SnapChat person but I didn’t. I’m still upset that happened. I still don’t understand why getting angry over someone not coming to me first but going to HR is that big of a deal.

Me: There are a lot of really good, detailed explanations in the comment section on the post. I recommend reading them with an open mind, because they will definitely explain where you went wrong. I hope you’re open to changing your thinking, so that you’re able to move forward in your career without being hindered by this. Otherwise it’s going to continue to harm you over and over.

LW: Ok but can I still get some credit for NOT doing it though? Or not firing ex employee? Or for looking out for my team and giving them opportunities? Isn’t that what managers do?

(Note from Alison: All comments on this post will be moderated, as I want to avoid a pile-on. I will not release unconstructive comments from moderation.)

update: is the work environment I’ve created on my team too exclusive? was originally published by Alison Green on Ask a Manager.

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minderella
3 days ago
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Oh god: "she was making us look bad by always going above and beyond for no reason." Yep, that's the siren song of an asshole complaining.
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pfctdayelise
15 days ago
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The thing that most shocks me here is that the letter writer is a woman
Melbourne, Australia
mindspillage
12 days ago
Yeah, I admit to being surprised by that too; it's a kind of failure mode I usually expect to see in men.

For years

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The sun plays a pivotal role in our everyday lives and has for years.

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minderella
5 days ago
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Never give Nazis an inch

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The KKK, the alt-right, white supremacists, and unabashed Nazis have all converged on Charlottesville to protest the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, treacherous defender of slavery, from a local park. They marched with torches through the city last night.

We can at least appreciate this moment of linguistic simplification: KKK, alt-right, white supremacist, and Nazi all refer to exactly the same thing, one united collection of deplorable bigots, and we should likewise unite to oppose them all. No more Nazis. Shun them, scorn them, punch them in the face. Tear down their monuments, trash their flags, fire them from their jobs.

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minderella
6 days ago
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Why is that man wearing sunglasses? It's nighttime.
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Simulationism

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Ironically, in this comic I'm reusing stock characters.

New comic!
Today's News:
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minderella
6 days ago
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Are good!

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This is a picture of the wording on an Italian-made baby jacket, a gift to the granddaughter of a friend of a friend after the child was baptised recently in Florence, Italy. Your guess at the intended meaning is as good as mine.

Perhaps the take-away lesson is that despite the high volume of strange translations into English found on Asian goods, signs, menus, etc., no one should think Language Log's 'Lost In Translation' category is solely about Asian languages. Translation fails are found all over. Never forget that remarkable memory of qualities with armed structure and crystals. After all, we have designed each corner thinking about its welfare, though the development business is reserved the right to make any change that be necessary.

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minderella
6 days ago
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I did not know that a bejeweled, poorly translated baby jacket was an appropriate gift to give to a baby who has just been baptized. You learn something new every day!
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