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How’s everyone doing tonight? Tell me your favorite joke.

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How’s everyone doing tonight? Tell me your favorite joke.
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minderella
1 hour ago
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Why do seagulls live by the sea? Because if they lived by the bay, they'd be called bagels.
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This color-matching widget takes the guesswork out of painting

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There are two times you never want to just "eyeball" it: Conducting brain surgery and matching shades of paint for your walls. Whether you're painting or repainting, make sure you're never just "close enough" to the color you want. Not when the Nix Mini Color Sensor can scan and match any color perfectly.

Small enough for your keychain, this innovative color-matching tool can scan any surface from fabric to walls using high CRI white LEDs. It then matches the exact hue of the surface to RGB, HEX, CMYK and LAB colors or one of 31,000 paint colors from brand names like Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore or Dulux. You can even save the colors to the Nix app (free lifetime access included with purchase), or share them via social media or email for quick design collaboration.

Sturdy and reliable, the Nix Mini Color Sensor is an armchair designer's new best friend - and it's currently on sale for 30% off. Pick one up for $69.

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minderella
21 hours ago
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I will post this comment every time I see Nix being reviewed. This product does not work. It doesn't even get close. Buyer beware. Save your money and just get paint chips.
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Carrot

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An heirloom variety called the Turkish Black (via).

More info at the World Carrot Museum.
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minderella
1 day ago
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HTTPSTER tee

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One of my all-time favorite tee-shirts is available again: the HTTPSTER by Christopher DeCaro ($25).

The hypertext-transfer-protocol antithetic hipster shirt for nerds, geeks and unicorns.

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minderella
1 day ago
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Watch Mr. Wizard

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This is a half-hour television episode from 1954. You'd have to be 60 years old or more to have seen this segment live, but younger visitors may remember later episodes or the Canadian revival in the 70s, or the updated Mr. Wizard's World of the 1980s.

For many baby boomers, this was our introduction to "hard science" and the concept that science could be interesting (and comprehensible). I suppose it would be different now; the teacher probably wouldn't be allowed to place a hand on Johnny's shoulder, and they probably couldn't make something explode on live camera by aerosolizing lighter fluid and igniting it.

Reposted from 2008, because Mental Floss has just posted an excellent history of the program:
Watch Mr. Wizard, which aired on NBC from 1951 to 1965, featured host Don Herbert performing a series of science experiments using everyday objects—glass bottles, cans, aquariums, matches—to illustrate the amazing world of physics. Eggs were sucked into bottles; water was boiled using an ice cube. They were pseudo-magic tricks, but instead of obscuring his method, Herbert satisfied the audience’s curiosity by explaining how science made them all possible...

Don Herbert Kemske was born July 10, 1917 in Waconia, Minnesota. He developed an interest in science while in the Boy Scouts and later obtained a degree in English and general science from the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse (then known as La Crosse State Teachers College) in 1940. But Herbert didn’t pursue a teaching career. Instead, he followed his interest in drama and theater to New York City, where he worked as a pageboy for NBC, acted opposite future First Lady Nancy Reagan, and was cast in a Broadway show...

Like a lot of television of the era, it was live, not taped. The pace was leisurely, with Herbert walking through general principles over the course of a half-hour. Crucially, he refused to wear a lab coat or conduct his experiments in a laboratory setting. Instead, he wore short-sleeved shirts and used common household items while broadcasting from a garage or kitchen...

Within a few years, Watch Mr. Wizard was being carried in more than 100 markets and was reaching between 1 and 3 million weekly viewers... After viewing a pilot, Nickelodeon agreed to fund 26 half-hour episodes of Mr. Wizard’s World for a 1983 premiere.

Following Herbert's death at age 89 in 2007, a National Science Foundation official claimed that, more than anyone, Herbert may have been the person most responsible for getting people interested in science. In the 1960s and 1970s, applicants to The Rockefeller University—a science research center based in New York City—were asked what inspired them to get into science. In the space allotted for an answer, half of them wrote: "Mr. Wizard."
What I didn't know in the 1950s was that Don Herbert was the uncle of one of my high-school classmates.  Posted for Steve, currently enjoying retirement in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
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minderella
7 days ago
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If you accept transgender, then why not trans-aged?

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The Washington Post reports that a man wishes to self-identify as twenty years younger than he actually is. Not only that, he wants the change reflected on his birth certificate. From the report:

Emile Ratelband, a 69-year-old who feels like he’s in his 40s… is asking a court in his hometown of Arnhem, southeast of Amsterdam, to change his birth certificate so that it says he took his first breath on March 11, 1969, rather than on March 11, 1949. The judges heard his case on Monday and promised they would render a verdict in the next several weeks.

Ratelband sees his request as no different from a petition to change his name or the gender he was assigned at birth — and isn’t bothered that this comparison might offend transgender people, whose medical needs have been recognized by the American Medical Association. It comes down to free will, he maintains.

“Because nowadays, in Europe and in the United States, we are free people,” he said in an interview with The Washington Post. “We can make our own decisions if we want to change our name, or if we want to change our gender. So I want to change my age. My feeling about my body and about my mind is that I’m about 40 or 45.”

Folks are already dismissing Ratebland’s request as different from and offensive to transgender people. But the obvious question is why? In what way is this different from transgenderism? A closer look reveals that there isn’t very much of a difference at all.

According to transgender ideology, when a person feels himself to be something other than his biological sex, then his psychological identity trumps his biological reality. Ratebland is requesting the same consideration with respect to age. He feels himself to be younger than his chronological age. He’s simply asking for his psychological identity to be recognized over his chronological reality. If it is wrong and oppressive to refuse to recognize the gender identity of the transgender, then why is it any less wrong and oppressive to refuse to recognize the chronological identity of the trans-aged?

Of course, I am not at all supporting Ratebland’s claim. I’m simply pointing out that the identity claim that he is making is no different than the one being made by a transgender person. If you accept one, consistency demands that you accept the other. To accept the one while refusing the other is… well… inconsistent at best and hypocritical at worst. Either a person’s self-identification trumps all other objective indications or it does not. You can’t have it both ways.

But there will be some who will try. Just watch. They will embrace transgender claims while rejecting out-of-hand trans-aged claims, and they will embrace the inconsistency without acknowledging it as such. How do we know? Because that is how they responded to the transracial claims of Rachel Dolezal. I expect nothing different here.

Transgender ideology is a black hole of illogic, sucking toward it all manner of unreasonableness and contradiction. It is a testimony to the power of LGBT propaganda that so few people in our culture detect the contradictions. But the contradictions are no less salient simply because so many people refuse to see them. The inconsistency is a real and obvious, and it serves no one to pretend otherwise.

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minderella
8 days ago
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I find this to be a very interesting question indeed, and have found myself sitting at a table not eating lunch while mulling this over.
My very first thought was of my aunt, who was 93 going on 55 and a serious whippersnapper living her life to the fullest. At 83 (still in the prime of her life), she needed a heart bypass surgery. The surgeon told the hospital that it was a waste of time, funds, etc to give an 83-year old this surgery. The nurses would not drop it and kept pestering the doc to at least *meet* my aunt to see her vivaciousness himself. He stalled for 36 hours before finally going to meet her face-to-face, when he was amazed at her health, her active lifestyle, and her alert intelligence. He scheduled the surgery after leaving her room. The surgery was successful, and my aunt lived for 12 more glorious, full years. So I completely agree that age is just a number and just because you've reached "X" years old doesn't mean you should act a certain way, or feel certain things or stop doing certain activities.
On the other hand, so many "milestones" in life are age-based. Could a 12-year old decide he's actually 22, and legally buy alcohol? Could a 14-year old decide he's 30, and marry a 32-year old? Could a 40-year old decide he's actually 8 and enroll himself in the second grade? Could I decide I'm 65 and start taking disbursements from my retirement and social security accounts now? All of these extreme situations seem to be silly and illogical, but I don't see the same extremes with a person born as a male human wishing to be recognized as a female human. Is it because with the age discrepancies, you gain rights as you age? You don't gain any rights from changing your gender or your name or even your hair color.
I believe that who we are born as and who we become are two different things. I don't think we should erase the past, while still allowing people to move on to who they are currently. I think birth certificates should have different fields for "birth " and "recognized ". My birth name was one field, but when I was adopted, my birth certificate was updated to reflect my adoptive parents were actually my birth parents. Even as a child I thought this was wrong: Mr A was not my biological father, and changing a piece of paper to say that he was doesn't make it true. Why couldn't my birth certificate remain saying my birth parents were Mr W and Ms P and my recognized parents are Mr A and Mrs A? And I feel the same about gender: the gender you were born with should remain on the initial certificate documenting your birth, but your current recognized gender is a different field.
I know there are no easy answers here, and people struggle to be recognized as the person they see themselves as, and part of that is always fluid.
A last thought on this before I get back to the office: my birth certificate says I was so many inches long/tall when I was born. Obviously I did not remain that same height (believe it or not). No one would ever look at my birth certificate and refuse to acknowledge that I'm 5'5" just because my certificate says I was 19" tall at the moment of my birth. Does the fact that I see myself as 5'5" mean I should have the right to change my certificate to say I was 5'5" at the moment of my birth? Or an even more extreme situation: what if, even though my birth certificate says I was 19" at birth, I am currently 5'5", but if I felt I was actually 1200' tall, would it make sense to allow me to change my birth certificate to say my birth height was 1200 feet?
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jepler
8 days ago
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I thoroughly disagree with the author's assertion of the equal epistemic(?) status of the two fields "date of birth" and "sex/gender" of a birth certificate.

I am at home with a world where a 5-second or even 50-year investigation of the shape of a body can't accurately reveal this (once assumed to be objective and unchanging) characteristic. Just think of it like pronouncing a baby a habitual criminal based on the debunked science of phrenology!

On the other hand, the truth of passing days and years seems just about as objective as anything; and find nothing particularly sinister in the way we codify it into a civil calendar which in turn enables legal contracts like "the term of the lease shall be 12 months from November 8, 2018".

Hopefully we some day arrive in a world where even if there's some reason to write down quick notes on the shape of baby genitals (one weird trick for telling babies apart with ~P(0.5)!), nobody insists on printing anything about it on our everyday ID cards, or imagines it should inform our use of pronouns or whether we should prefer white wine or lite beer.
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
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